Introduction…

Hi there. Welcome to my blog.

I suspect I’m probably talking to myself here, as of course, i have no followers, however, i shall pretend a cast of thousands are hanging onto my every word, in order to ensure the standard of writing is at least up to par.

So, for reasons which i won’t bore you all with now, i have migrated from a fairly high pressure, exec type job, to being a house husband. Whereas i was once concerned with preparing PowerPoints and group emails, i now fill my days chasing slugs off my bok choi and wondering what else i can use vinegar for in keeping the house clean (as it turns out, quite a lot, including fabric conditioner and surface cleaner).

A few months ago, Mrs Manhoovers (MM) and i decided to setup a couple of veggie patches in the garden. Nothing huge, just some spinach, lettuce, parsley, peas and carrots.

It’s been very successful. The spinach plants, I’m sure, are related to the triffids, as they have really ‘gone off’, and i had to cull some for the sake of the local environment.

MM suggested a spinach and feta pie. Sounds good to me.

Further to all this self sustainability, should our world crumble to an end, with only spinach being used as currency, i have taken to foraging around the local environment for wild ingredients. We’re lucky enough to live near the beach, a creek and a wetlands environment, so there was a fair chance of finding something edible.

Armed with my new guide to identifying edible weeds (highly recommend this tome, if you’re interested), junior and i wandered into the wilds in search of sustenance…

So, i introduce you to “Spinach, Mallow and Feta pie”, served with potato salad and mallow seed heads.

I basically followed this recipe, which in itself is taken from Jamie Oliver’s 30 Minute Meals, and made a fairly standard potato salad (with parsley from the garden) and lightly fried the mallow seed heads with some mushrooms and angled onion (a wild growing member of the onion family)

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This is a mallow plant. The seed heads are quite distinctive and the leaves can be used as a spinach replacement. They’re quite nice raw too. Use the smaller leaves and the green seed heads, as they’re softer than the brown ones.

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Mallow seed heads and leaves. I collected about 2 handfuls of each…

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The seed heads are really distinctive, you can’t really confuse them with anything poisonous 🙂

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The finished pie, with a side of mallow heads, mushrooms and angled onion in lemon juice. I won’t show you a picture of a potato salad. It looked like a potato salad…

So there you go, its been about an hour or so since dinner, and no one has keeled over from mallow poisoning, even the 4 year old said he “loved mallow heads”!

During my jaunt, i also found some wild growing fennel, so am looking for how to cook that effectively.

Thanks for taking the time to read this, i really encourage you to grab a simple book on plant identification and discover what herbal delights are lurking on your doorstep.

Cheers.